Frequent Concerns

Double Row of Teeth - 'Shark Teeth'

We are often asked about kids growing teeth behind their baby teeth as shown in the photos below. This occurs because the permanent teeth form behind the roots of the baby teeth and sometimes they grow behind the baby tooth before it falls out. When this occurs most the time no treatment is needed, nature usually takes care of the situation, but occasionally the baby tooth does have to be extracted (pulled). If your child has a permanent tooth growing behind the baby tooth do not panic, be patient; at the next regular check-up visit, an x-ray may be necessary to determine if any treatment is needed, if you are too concerned to wait for the regular check-up call and make an appointment for a quick check of the situation. The chances of the tooth correcting on its own are great if there is room for the tooth to move forward (see the series of one child’s photos below). Unfortunately in a crowded mouth, with out adequate space only braces will straighten teeth, and generally braces should not be considered until the child is much older (around the age of 12). Options can be discussed the next time your child visits the dental office.

Permanent teeth form behind baby teeth

Permanent teeth form behind the roots of the baby teeth

Permanent teeth before the baby teeth

Often the permanent tooth will grow before the baby tooth falls watch what happens

Baby tooth has fallen on its own

Four months later baby tooth has fallen on its own with a little help from the patient

Permanent tooth has moved forward

Twelve months later permanent tooth has moved forward and another permanent tooth has come in slightly crooked

Crooked tooth is improving

Twenty two months later next two baby have fallen and crooked tooth is improving

Teeth are in good position

Forty eight months after the first picture teeth are in good position

Lip Bite

We are asked occasionally about a white scab that sometimes a patient develops after treatment. Some parents confuse this for looking like a burn when it is really from the patient biting themselves while being numb. There is no treatment for this trauma other than time to allow to heal.

Lip bite
Lip bite detail

My Child has a Bruise on their Gum?

Eruption cyst or a hematoma

This is not a bruise but something that is called an eruption cyst or a hematoma. This is a sack of fluid that the permanent tooth grows and develops in and occasionally will appear on the surface of the gums. There is usually no treatment that is needed and will burst when the permanent tooth grows in.


Erupting Molar

Erupting Molar

Sometimes the question arises and in a panic state that a tooth has broken off in a child’s mouth. If the tooth looks similar to the one in the picture the tooth is not broken but still erupting or growing in the mouth. This is a normal process that takes place as the tooth develops and will look normal once the tooth is fully in the mouth. New molars grow in the mouth around age 6, 12, and 18.


Fractured Tooth

Fractured Tooth

This is a picture of a fractured tooth from an injury. When an injury like this happens to a permanent tooth, time is important for treatment to take place.

Notice the three layers of the tooth shown in this picture and compare and make mention of the comparison when calling for your child’s emergency.

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